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20121009
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the states that passed a law requiring identification at the polls on election day. in pennsylvania, the tough new law is now on hold after a judge said it cannot be enforced on election day, which, of course, is just 35 days away now. more on this story from our justice correspondent pete williams. >> for months, voters have struggled to meet pennsylvania's strict new requirement for a government issued photo i.d. at the polls. a law democrats claim republicans pushed to suppress the turnout among poor and minority voters. first, voters without a driver's license would need a state issued i.d. card, because that's a secure i.d. that can be used to board planes, voters needed a birth certificate and three forms of identification to get one. >> and it took me days just to get my i.d. >> reporter: then the state relented and began issuing a new i.d., good only for voting, but kept shifting the requirements for it. >> this was a hastily drawn law designed to disrupt the vote for the presidential election. >> reporter: today the judge concluded the gap between the photo i.d.s issued and
. >>> a pennsylvania judge will let voters go to the polls without photo i.d., upholding a controversial state law that requires identification but stopping it from taking effect until after elections. voters in pennsylvania will be asked for i.d. but will still be able to vote if they don't have it. democrats are touting the ruling as a win for minority and low-income voters who they say might otherwise have been disenfranchised by that law. the raynes claim the law was common sense reform. according to the brennan center for justice which opposes voting law restrictions, 19 states have passed laws or executive actions since 2011 that impact voter turnout. of those, 14 are already in effect, including the one in pennsylvania. >>> now to business. home prices up 4.6% in august from a year ago. the largest year-over-year gain in six years. august marked the sixth consecutive month home prices rose in the united states. let's go to cnbc's jeff cutmore, live in london. >> good morning. you know how the saying goes, if there's a wealth effect in the housing market you get the trickle down. that's what
see. here with it is cnn's kyon law. >>> dinner time means family time at the skillman household, from who is chopping to who's stirring. to who's sitting around the table and who soon won't. how hard is this for your family? >> not real sure. i don't think it's hit them yet. i really don't. >> reporter: a grandfather to three girls, his other title is master sergeant dan skillman, u.s. army reserves. he deploys to afghanistan in weeks, with his wife, master sergeant lola skillman and their oldest son, james, a sergeant. husband, wife, and son will be gone nine months as reserve support at kandahar. despite the 29 years that lola served, this will be her first time deployed to a war zone. are you scared at all? >> yes. some people say no, they're not scared, they're ready to go do this. but i think in the back of everybody's mind it is a little bit terrifying. >> reporter: at the skillman home where the unpaved road meets a montana big sky, they know about sacrifice for country. lola's father was awarded the purple heart during world war ii. dan's father joined the national guard. dan
's their licensing laws. >> bill: let's get back to campus. if you're dating somebody on the campus, then you can't suggest that intimacy should happen? >> you can't implicitly or explicitly ask someone for sex. which raises the question, how do you get there? >> bill: are you going to answer the question? >> i don't know. i think if you have sex, it must be rape since you weren't allowed to -- >> bill: you can't overtly ask or even like -- how about a little wink? can you do that? >> apparently. >> bill: you can wink or you can't? 'cause that may be implicity, if i do that, i could be implying something. >> i'm sure totalitarian left would have an opinion because you would have to go before one of their tribunals. the truth is that they were -- >> bill: they have tribunals there? >> they rarely punish people for these things. but when you have all these rules and they have a civility code which would ban you, what it means is they use them to punish people they don't like and those are usually people like you. >> bill: tell me about the civility code at the university of north carolina. >> all s
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)